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The Grief Process: What to Expect When You’re Going Through Loss

In this blog, Mandy Capehart is going to show you how to create a Restorative Grief Project in your own community. This project is designed to help grievers and grief supporters find healing and hope after a loss. Mandy Capehart is a certified grief and life coach, and she has experienced loss herself. After her mother died in 2016, she realized there was a lack of resources available to help people through their grief. So she decided to create a space where people could share their stories and find support. The Restorative Grief Project is a safe place for people to fall apart and not have any answers. It’s a space where people can share their experiences and learn from each other. If you’re looking for a place to heal after a loss, this blog is for you.

Mandy Capehart is an author, speaker, and certified grief and life coach who helps people find their own values and what’s important to them. She is the founder of the Restorative Grief Project, which is an online community of grievers and grief supporters looking for movement while they heal. Capehart is from the Pacific Northwest and has experienced loss herself, which has driven her to help others facing similar situations.

Mandy Capehart is an author, speaker, and certified grief and life coach. They started the Restorative Grief Project in 2020 in response to the pandemic and the lack of grief literacy in the world. The project is an online community of grievers and grief supporters that provides a safe space for people to fall apart and not have any answers. The goal is to help people find their own values and what’s important to them so they can realign with a centered sense of peace and stillness.

Here are the steps you need to follow to also get Grief literacy.:
1. Grief is normal and natural, and we all experience it differently.

2. There is no right or wrong way to grieve, and there is no timeline for grieving.

3. It is okay to feel uncomfortable emotions and to express them honestly and vulnerably.

1. Grief is normal and natural, and we all experience it differently.
Grief is a normal and natural response to loss, and we all experience it in different ways. There is no one right way to grieve, and there is no timeline for grief. It is important to allow yourself to experience all the emotions and thoughts that come with grief, and to find ways to express yourself that are helpful for you. There is no shame in grief, and it is okay to ask for help if you are struggling.

There are many different stages of grief, and it is normal to go through all of them, or to move back and forth between them. The most cited stages are denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. However, it is important to remember that everyone experiences grief differently, and there is no one right way to grieve. It is also important to remember that grief is not a linear process. You may not go through all the stages, or you may not go through them in order. You may also find yourself moving back and forth between stages. That is all normal and okay. Grief is a complex and difficult emotion, and it takes time to work through it. If you are struggling with grief, it is important to reach out for help. Talk to a friend, family member, therapist, or any other support system you have. There is no shame in asking for help, and there are many people who understand what you are going through.

2. There is no right or wrong way to grieve, and there is no timeline for grieving.
There is no right or wrong way to grieve, and there is no timeline for grieving. Grief is an active, engaging process that when you are grieving, you are experiencing the loss kind of firsthand. And the more time we spend being intentional about that, I think the more frequently we will experience those moments of grieving like you were talking about, but it will feel less disruptive. So in a sense of like, if you picture yourself on this path, right, that spirals in on itself. So you start in the center and you’re slowly walking out. You’re going to encounter places that you’ve come by before, but you’re going at it from a different perspective. You’re further out from the center of the event. You can still see and you experience things, but you’re learning more. So you’re kind of expanding and including part of your story that came before you and gaining some insight and applying new versions like the new understanding of who you are, what serves you well and what brings you back into alignment shows up.

So grief is this process that helps us move through and understand our losses. It’s something that is unique to each individual, and there is no one right way to do it. Grieving is an ongoing process, and there is no timeline for it. You might find yourself revisiting certain aspects of your loss as you continue to grow and change. Grief is a natural and necessary part of healing, and it can be a powerful force in our lives.

3. It is okay to feel uncomfortable emotions and to express them honestly and vulnerably.
The third step in the grief process is to begin to accept the loss. This can be a difficult and painful step, but it is a necessary one. In order to move on from grief, we must first accept that the person or thing we lost is gone. This can be a difficult thing to do, but it is important to remember that the pain of grief will eventually fade and we will be able to remember the good times we had with the person or thing we lost.

It is okay to feel uncomfortable emotions and to express them honestly and vulnerably. However, it is important to remember that the pain of grief will eventually fade. In order to move on from grief, we must first accept that the person or thing we lost is gone. This can be a difficult thing to do, but it is important to remember that the good times we had with the person or thing we lost will eventually outweigh the pain of the loss.

If you are grieving, know that you are not alone. Millions of people around the world are grieving at any given time. Grief is a natural response to loss, and there is no right or wrong way to grieve. Take the time you need to heal, and reach out for help if you need it.

I’d love to hear about you and your experience with getting Grief literacy.. Leave me a comment on how it went for you or drop any questions you want me to answer!

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